HISTORY

Tapputi – (Perfumer) (2000 BC+/-)

Tapputi, also referred to as Tapputi-Belatekallim (“Belatekallim” refers to female overseer of a palace), is considered to be the world’s first chemist, a perfume-maker mentioned in a cuneiform (clay) tablet from the second millennium BC in Babylonian Mesopotamia. She used flowers, oil, and calamus along with cyprus, myrrh, and balsam. She added water then was distilled and filtered several times.

Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia

Gaius Julius Caesar (100–44 BC)

Egypt was so identified with perfume that during Julius Caesar’s Roman triumphs, perfume bottles were tossed to the crowd to demonstrate his mastery over Egypt.

In the early Middle Ages the Arabs would mix musk with the mortar used to build new mosques in order to make them scented.

Oil was considered a necessity of life in Egypt’s arid climate. Even the common working man typically received a daily allocation of oil, amongst his wages, The addition of scent, however, transformed a daily necessity into a luxury.

Despite an earlier ban in the 6th century prohibiting the use of perfumes, men and women alike applied them lavishly, before and after baths, during the day and on all parts of the body.

The Egyptians were the first to incorporate perfume into their culture followed by the rest of the ancient world.  The earliest use of perfume bottles was also Egyptian and dates to around 1000 BC, the Egyptians invented glass and perfume bottles and were one of the first common uses for glass.

Antique Bottles
Antique Bottles

The people in that society carried perfume with them from birth until after their death, many Egyptians put perfumes in their tombs to keep their skin silky smooth in the afterlife. Urns encrusted with gold, jars of delicate pottery, filled with aromatics were placed in the tombs.  So potent were some of the oils used that 3,300 years after Tutankhamen’s death traces of fragrance in the tightly sealed pots of unguents could be detected when the tomb was opened. Perfumes were used during the embalming process as well and took 40 to 70 days to complete.  Powdered myrrh, cassia and other perfumes were used in this process.

Urns
Urns

The Romans indulged in the practice of applying perfume three times a day.  Pet dogs and horses were also perfumed.  At feasts, birds were released from their cages to dispense perfume from their wings; draperies, candlesticks, tables and cushions were all perfumed.  The servants wore musk, marjoram, spikenard, and other aromatics.

Hungary Water (1300+/-)

Hungary water (sometimes called “the Queen of Hungary’s Water”) was the first (European) alcohol-based perfume, claimed to date to about the late 14th century. According to legend it was first formulated at the command of a Queen of Hungary, sometimes identified as Isabella but usually as Elisabeth, or in one document “Saint Elisabeth, Queen of Hungary”.  The exact date of the invention of Hungary water is lost to history. It is also unclear who in particular created it.

Elizabeth of Hungary
Elizabeth of Hungary

 

Catherine de Medici (1500+/-)

Europe did not use perfume much until the sixteenth century when Catherine de Medici came from Italy to marry the future king. She wore gloves of perfumed leather and suddenly everybody wanted this. The best place to get these gloves was from France which soon became the perfume capital of the world.

Catherine de Medici
Catherine de Medici

 

Eau de Cologne (1709)

In the early 18th century, the Italian expatriate Johann Maria Farina (1685–1766) created a new fragrance and named it Eau de Cologne (“water from Cologne”), after his new residence, Cologne, Germany (pronounced Köln).  It was used by Napoleon I and his beloved Josephine, the worlds first unisex fragrance.

Cologne, Germany
Cologne, Germany

 

Napoleon (1879)

Prince Louis Napoleon was famously wearing Creed when he died in 1879 in a field in South Africa, perforated by Zulu spears according to Creeds official website.

Louis Napoleon
Louis Napoleon

 

Parfums de Rosine (1911)

On the 24th of June 1911 Paul Poiret unveiled “Parfums de Rosine”, named after his daughter, in a flamboyant manner. A grand soiree was held at his palatial home, a costume ball with 250 attending from the cream of Parisian society and the artistic world. Poiret became the first couturier to launch a signature fragrance linked to a design house.

Parfums de Rosine
Parfums de Rosine

 

Chanel No. 5 (1921)

The world fell in love with Chanel 5 in 1921, it’s iconic fragrance along with its bottle shape will forever be remembered.  Gabrielle Chanel redefined convention by building a world of understated elegance and modernity around her fragrances. To this day, this same modern approach and spirit of tradition remain at the heart of all Chanel Fragrances.  Chanel uses natural and exceptional raw materials from all over the world and directly controls production of signature ingredients, such as May Rose and Grass Jasmine.

Chanel No. 5
Chanel No. 5

 

Gerlain Shalimar (1925)

Shalimar, introduced in 1925, is considered to be the first modern oriental.

Shalimar
Shalimar

 

Dior Diorissimo (1956)

In 1956 Edmond Roudnitska created Diorissimo, the worlds first Gourmand fragrance, though not made popular until Angel in 1992.

Diorissimo
Diorissimo

 

YSL Opium (1977)

YSL Opium
YSL Opium

 

Azzaro Pour Homme (1978)

Azzaro Pour Homme
Azzaro Pour Homme

 

Cacharel Anais Anais (1979)

Anais Anais
Anais Anais

 

Fragrance Wheel (1983)

Micheal Edwards created the fragrance wheel in 1983 after being a consultant for the fragrance industry.

Fragrance Wheel
Fragrance Wheel

 

Creed Green Irish Tweed – American Release (1985)

Green Irish Tweed was the first Creed fragrance to be released in the U.S. in 1985 by Olivier Creed Sixth Generation.

Green Irish Tweed
Green Irish Tweed

 

Dior Poison Christian (1985)

Poison
Poison

 

Calvin Klein Eternity (1988)

Eternity
Eternity

Angel Thierry Mugler (1992)

Thierry Mugler’s Angel, 1992 made history for the gourmands that will continue for many generations.  Angel was also the first blue fragrance, prior to that only blue bottles or packaging.  Angel’s rich, intoxicating scent is still a favorite today for women of every age. 

Angel
Angel

Issey Miyake L’eau d’Issey (1992)

L’eau d’Issey, 1992 made the aquatics/marines a popular choice a type of fragrance introduced to the scene with New West in 1990. 

L'eau d'Issey
L’eau d’Issey

 

Gucci Envy (1997)

Chiffon Sorbet by Escada in 1993, the first limited edition summer fragrance by the German brand to make a fruity floral.  This type of fragrance took to the mainstream quickly and is still hugely popular.  The fruity floral is a fragrance based on a floral with a light woody/white musk base for longevity and heavy amounts of fruits for sweet accents throughout.  Chiffon Sorbet was based on a passion fruit accord but it also evoked notes of mango, ripe fig, apples, raspberries, etc.  Fruits, apart from citrus’, cannot be expressed or distilled, due to their high water content, and only a synthesized replication in the laboratory can offer illusions of the fruit bowl.

Envy
Envy

 

Afteliers Pink Lotus (2003)

Afteliers Pink Lotus fragrance was especially created for Madonna in 2003.

Pink Lotus
Pink Lotus
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